One month on – ‘Pinning’ down that New Year’s Resolution

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If 2012 is anything to go by, it seems young Aussie women who’ve pledged to eat better and lose weight as a part of their 2013 New Year’s resolution may need a helping hand to reach to their goals.

The ‘Young Women’s Nutrition Study’, commissioned by the Dietitians Association of Australia, revealed that although around two in three tried to lose weight in the past year, 80 per cent did not achieve what they had hoped and would still like to lose more.

The study also found that this year 68 per cent of 18-24 year-old Aussie women have resolved to eat healthier and 42 per cent are hoping to lose weight.

So now that the first month of the year has come to a close, why not try a new approach to make those newly-found health commitments year-long habits, and consult the digital realm?

Virtual pinboard Pinterest exploded in popularity during 2012, and could be a solution for those who find themselves visually inspired.

According to website Social Media News, about 650,000 Australians were using Pinterest by the end of 2012, making it the 10th most popular social media site. This is a significant increase from the end of 2011 when there were fewer than 48,000 users.

Whether you’re after healthy recipes, exercise tips, weight-loss stories, motivational mantras – or all of the above – to help you stick to your 2013 resolution, you’re sure to find it on Pinterest.

But be warned: the most popular pin of all time is a recipe for cheesy garlic bread, with almost 97,000 pins at last count. If you’re worried such temptations may derail your 2013 health strategy, or are new to Pinterest, refine your search by heading straight to the ‘health and fitness’ category.

Alternatively, below are a few of Cube’s top health and fitness pin-boards to get you started. Happy health-pinning!

 

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Social Highlights of 2012

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Niki Hennessy

To cap off 2012 and welcome the New Year, Cube has decided to jump on the ‘year in review’ bandwagon and compile a list of social media highlights (in no particular order) from last year. Here are some of our favourite trends, milestones and moments in social media from 2012. We hope you enjoy! Let us know if there are any you love or that we’ve missed.

Felix Baumgartner’s freefall from 128,100 feet
Felix Baumgartner’s space jump was not only an amazing feat of human adrenaline-junkie craziness, but a very effective piece of branded content from Red Bull.

The first ‘social’ Olympics

Touted as the first ‘social’ Olympics, London 2012 certainly brought a new aspect to the Olympics commentary. More tweets were sent during a single day of the London Olympics than were posted during the entire 17 days of the Beijing Olympics. For the first time athletes tweeting during the games were given the chance to broadcast their own thoughts, experiences and messages of thanks to the world. While most were positive and grateful, there were some who still needed to be briefed on the ‘dos and don’ts’ of social media as a public figure.
According to Radian6, the first day of the Olympics scored almost 3 million mentions on Twitter alone. Usain Bolt had over 960,000 social media mentions throughout the games, taking gold as the athlete most discussed, whilst Michael Phelps came in second with 830,000.

Ridiculously Photogenic Guy
(We couldn’t compile a highlights list without him :) )
Being snapped turning to smile at a friend while participating in a fun run turned into an internet sensation for Zeddie Little aka ‘Ridiculously Photogenic Guy’. The photo, posted by a photographer Will King, became one of the highlight (we believe) memes of 2012.

The rise and rise of Pinterest
Having only officially become an ‘open’ platform in August 2012, the exponential growth of Pinterest has been incredible. The network drives more referral traffic to retailers than
YouTube, LinkedIn and Google+ combined and sees users spend an average of just under 17 minutes on the site.

With the launch of business profiles last October, 2013 will be an interesting year for Pinterest, and we think we can expect to see more growth and developments from the platform.

The first Pinterest campaign
Kotex in Israel, with help from Smoyz, was quick off the mark when Pinterest began to boom, launching the first Pinterest campaign with Women’s Inspiration Day.
A simple idea, beautifully executed, Women’s Inspiration Day saw Kotex find 50 women and identify what inspired them through their Pinterest boards. Their inspiration boards were then brought to life as a gift pack and sent to each woman – generating chatter on Pinterest, Twitter, Facebook and Instagram.

 

The most re-tweeted image ever

The Pope joins Twitter

Sh*t Mates Don’t Say

The Cancer Council took a bit more of a risqué approach in 2012 with their play on the popular ‘Sh*t Girls Say’ meme with their own campaign ‘Sh*t mates don’t say’ campaign.

Gangnam Style Hits 1 Billion YouTube views
Knocking Justin Bieber from his perch as ‘Most watched YouTube video in history’, K-Pop star PSY hit 1 billion views with his Gangnam Style video clip in December. Love it or hate it, the song has scored a major social media milestone.

 

Facebook hits 1 Billion Users

One Small Tweet
In honour of Neil Armstrong and to celebrate his life the John F Kennedy Presidential Library and Museum developed One Small Tweet a ‘tweet-fuelled Luna voyage’ to digitally retrace Neil Armstrong’s famous journey to the moon one tribute at a time.

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To engage in social media or not to engage, that is the question! But what’s the answer?

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By Claire Leggott

question mark

In part two of Cube’s update from the Inaugural Social Media in Healthcare Conference we explore the hot topic of how and when to enter the world of healthcare social media. 

From Facebook, Twitter and blogs, to the new kids on the block – Google+ and Pinterest – the social media sphere is ever expanding and brands/companies seem to be embracing new communication channels with increasing vigour.

However, hesitancy to engage with digital remains in many industries, including the pharmaceutical industry.  Employing a level of caution is prudent as navigating social media within the confines of the Medicines Australia Code of Conduct can be a daunting and somewhat tricky business.

It need not be scary though, as Andrew Moore, from Sanofi, pointed out .He believes a fear of the unknown or seemingly uncontrollable should not hold pharmaceutical companies back, and spoke about a listening campaign – social media monitoring – which formed part of Sanofi’s first foray into social media.  Getting the campaign up and running involved overcoming challenges regarding the potential for mass adverse event reporting, but in reality adverse event reports occurred with just 0.3% of product mentions.  Andrew advocates a listening campaign as an ideal way for companies to dip their toe into the social media water and as a platform from which an effective social media communications strategy can be developed.

Further voices of experience were heard at the conference, with both Simon Lillis from PwC in Sydney, and Kerrie Noonan from The Groundswell Project, highlighting the vital components to ensuring a successful strategy.  Put simply:

  • Identify a very clear and simple goal/objective
  • Interact with the audience (although beware of going too strong and over-facing the audience)

Elisabeth Tuckey, from Headspace, also emphasised the importance of understanding your audience.  For example, males don’t often ‘like’ pages on Facebook but are drawn by visuals so YouTube is an impactful communication channel for men.

It is clear just how much communication is now taking place online, be it on a computer/laptop or mobile device.  Discussion about a brand will be taking place somewhere within the digital ether regardless of whether said brand is actively targeting audiences in this sphere.

Cultivating a social media presence does come with some risks but ignoring this communication channel could be the biggest risk of all.

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Pinterest: how digital pictures can tell a thousand words, and then drive traffic to your website

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By Johanna Waide

Pinterest – the latest digital media application everyone seems to be using in their personal lives as well as in the business world. It’s hard to believe that the humble pin board that adorns the kitchen walls has morphed into a virtual visual feast that allows us to reach beyond the written word to tell a story.

Put simply, Pinterest is a fast and cheap way to share content including photographs, videos and links to other websites. It’s also a great way to categorise images and content, by moving ‘Pins’ into separate pin boards like advertising, fitness and kids or pregnancy.

Signing up to Pinterest is currently by invitation only. Once the request to join is approved (which may take up to a week), users can then begin to follow, re-pin and comment on the pin boards of others that they find interesting or inspiring.

invitepin

signup

Since launching in March 2010 Pinterest has made waves because of its ability to draw big numbers in terms of online traffic.

Web information company Alexa.com reported that the site is currently ranked the 42nd most popular website in the world, coming in at number 26 in Australia. Additionally, according to Australian social media statistics, the number of Pinterest users grew from around 190,000 in February 2012 to 350,000 in March – an increase of 160,000 in just one month.

Industry experts say that this popularity will continue to climb as millions of new pins are added everyday from all over the globe. The site also has impressive ‘length of stay’ engagement numbers, third only to time spent on Facebook and Tumblr.

Because of this hype, Pinterest is already being used by businesses to further their online presence.

However, just as with any communication tool, it’s important to consider whether this new social medium aligns with your organisation’s core purpose and values, as well as how it can best be used in ways that benefit all stakeholders.

Here are our top five picks of the ways businesses might use Pinterest:

1. Promote products and services

As the saying goes, a picture is worth a thousand words, making Pinterest’s visual focus a powerful opportunity for businesses to engage and educate audiences about its products and services. Ways this can be achieved include adding pins of new product images, ‘how-to’ video demonstrations featuring a brand’s products or user-generated photographs showcasing a products’ unique or special features.

2. Showcase core values – all of them

At present the site hasn’t created a distinction between personal and brand profiles. While the temptation may be to post pins related only to your products, user etiquette is very important within the Pinterest community, so boards that are too self-promoting won’t be well received.

US grocery chain Whole Foods Market have set a benchmark in achieving an optimal balance between product-endorsement, enticing user interest and showcasing the different facets of an organisation.

Quoted on Mashable, Whole Foods Market’s Global Online Community Manager, Michael Bepko, explains how they have leveraged the platform as a marketing tool: “It allows us to curate images from across the web that really speak to who we are as a company, images that reflect our core values and essentially communicate the essence of who we are.”

Whole Foods Market’s Pinterest profile currently consists of 40 pin boards. Pin board topics range from recipes using the store’s produce (which have quirky titles such as Cheese is the Bee’s Knees and Eat your Veggies) to boards that promote external causes including Earth Day. Although global in its outreach now, the organisation also pays homage to its humble establishment in Texas in 1980 and has a board that encourages people to pin useful, interesting & influential Texan things & Texans to follow on Pinterest.

To check out why Whole Foods Market has almost 30,000 Pinterest followers, visit their profile by clicking here.

3. Engage in conversation

For businesses Pinterest provides a channel to access and respond to user comments regarding their products or brand/s in general.

Additionally, like Twitter, Pinterest uses hashtags (keywords) to enable its search functionality and generate trending topics. By adding one or multiple hashtags to your pin descriptions (up to 500 characters), you can increase the likelihood users will come across your pins.

4. Add a “Pint It” and/or Pinterest “Follow” button to your website or blog

Adding a Pinterest button to your online platforms not only lets your audience know that you’re present on the site, it allows users to re-pin your posts to their own Pinterest profiles.

Follow this link to learn how to add Pinterest buttons: https://pinterest.com/about/goodies/

5. Drive website traffic

Last but certainly not least, Pintrest may help drive website traffic and boost search engine optimisation (SEO).

When users add a pin, they can include a URL in the description, thus creating links between posts and specific websites or blogs. Additionally, as PR and communications blog Bianchi Biz Blog aptly explain, when a user adds an image to a pin board from an online source, the original link is automatically stored within the image, allowing visitors to click back to the original source.

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While these tips highlight just some of Pinterest’s exciting and innovative features, before deciding to use the social media platform, the golden rule of communication still stands: ensure it is (or has the potential to be) relevant and meaningful to your target community.

What primarily separates Pinterest from other social media sites such as Facebook and Twitter is its adherence to a single media form, the picture. In other words, what you need to consider is whether pictures can tell your audience what you want them to hear. Can Pinterest tell your story?

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